THE AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING

VOLUME 33 ISSUE 2

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Exploring why some terminally ill people die in hospital when home was their preferred choice
This small study was designed to gain a better understanding of issues that led to hospital admission of palliative care clients who had a preference for home death, but died in hospital.

KEY WORDS: palliative care, home death, hospital death, preferred site of death, rural.

Nicola Champion,RN, MHMQL, Clinical Services Coordinator, Port Pirie Palliative Care Service, Country Health SA Local Health Network
Port Pirie. South Australia, Australia
Prof Paul Morrison, RMN, RN, BA, PhD, PGCE, GradDip Counselling, Dean, School of Health Professions, Murdoch University, Mandurah, Western Australia, Australia
Dr Kristina Medigovich, RN, BN (Hons), GradDipEd, PhD, Lecturer, School of Health Professions, Murdoch University, Mandurah, Western Australia, Australia

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Risk stratification for obstructive sleep apnoea and optimal post-operative monitoring in an overnight stay ward
Prospective data is required to clarify the role of a one night stay ward (23-hour ward, 23HW) for the post-operative monitoring of surgical patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim was to use a modified American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) screening tool to stratify the perioperative risk of OSA related complications and evaluate the role of a 23HW in the post-operative management of this patient group.

KEY WORDS: obstructive sleep apnoea, elective surgical procedures, post-operative period, hypoxemia, CPAP, screening tool.

Dr Vasanth Rao Kadam, MD, DNB, FANZCA, Senior clinical lecturer, The University of Adelaide. Department of Anaesthesia, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia, Australia
Dr Phuong Markman, MBBS, BMedSci, Anaesthetics registrar, Department of Anaesthetics, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia, Australia
Sally Neumann, RN, BN, Grad Dip Nurs, MHlthAdmin, Clinical Services Co-ordinator, High Dependency Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia, Australia.
Sandi Kingisepp, RN, RM, RCCN, DipNursing Management, Bch Nursing Management, Clinical Services Consultant, Recovery Unit, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Woodville, South Australia, Australia

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Health literacy: how nurses can make a difference
To be a call to action to nurses and all health professionals to implement proven effective evidence based strategies that can decrease health literacy demands on health consumers, and improve health outcomes and the provision of safe person-centred health care.

KEY WORDS: health literacy; patient education; social determinants; patient communication; patient education; health literate organisation.

Anne Johnson, RN, RM, PICNC, Dip T, Grad Dip Health Counselling, B Ed, M Ed, PhD, Academic status as Associate Professor Public Health, Flinders University, Community Engagement Consultant, Penola, South Australia, Australia

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Using clinical reasoning and simulation-based education to ‘flip’ the Enrolled Nurse curriculum
This paper describes the development and implementation of an innovative Diploma of Nursing curriculum for preparing Enrolled Nursing students for acute care nursing practice.

KEY WORDS: Enrolled nurse, flipped classroom, simulation, clinical reasoning.

Dr Lisa Dalton, RN, PhD, MN, GDipAdvNg, GCertQA, BN, Associate Head, International School of Health Sciences, University of Tasmania, Launceston Tasmania, Australia
Tamara Gee, RN, MEd, GCert Clinical Simulation, GCert T&L for Health Professionals, & GCert Anaesthetics and Recovery Room Nursing, Coordinator Simulation/ Nurse Educator, Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation, Health Education and Research Centre, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Prof Tracy Levett-Jones, RN, PhD, MEd & Work, Professor, Director of the Research Centre for Health Professional Education, Deputy Head of School (Teaching and Learning), School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, Australia

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Can Generation Y nurses supply areas of shortage? New graduate challenges in today’s job market
Workforce attitudes, such as intent to stay, leave temporarily, or exit permanently from nursing, develop at an early career stage. This paper explores the mismatch between the challenges faced by nursing graduates (of whom many belong to Generation Y) in obtaining a Registered Nurse (RN) position following graduation and the continuing shortages in nurse workforce in aged care and mental health areas.

KEY WORDS: Generation Y, workforce, nursing graduates, shortage, mental health, aged care.

Sybèle Christopher, RN, MN (Sydney), MPH (UNSW), Ortho Cert CN, PhD Candidate, Lecturer, Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
Prof Elizabeth Chiarella, RN, RM LLB (Hons), DipNEd, PhD, FCN, FRCNA, Professor of Nursing, Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia
Prof Donna Waters, RN, PhD MPH (Sydney) BA (Macquarie), Paed Cert FCN, Dean, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia

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